Propionates food additives

Thankyou for your very informative list. Although I was given 341, 363, 478, 904, 1442 as ones for my son to avoid as well and I could not find what foods they are in which makes it hard. The sad and disgusting part of all this is that our government allows these poisons into our foods which is pathetic. Ban all these and I would imagine all of our health would improve and why should we have to do the governments work in looking at every packet of food to make sure we are not being silently poisoned. Yes these additives may preserve the food and in fact studies have shown that if someone has died and if you checked their body in ten years time it would not have broken down because of the amount of preservatives so yes not only do they preserve the food we eat but preserves our bodies when we are gone but silently kills us in the process. What a lovely world we live in. Thanks again.

Chilling to temperatures below the growth range, but above freezing, stops reproduction but kills few cells except for extremely sensitive organisms, such as vegetative cells of Clostridium perfringens. Freeze kills part of a microbial population within a few hours and storage continues to be lethal at a much slower rate. The rate of population reduction varies with the nature of the food, as illustrated in Figure 7; the most rapid drop in aerobic plate count (“total count”) occurred in orange juice, which is an acid product. Bacterial spores die very slowly, if at all, during freezing and frozen storage. For example, the vegetative cells of Clostridium perfringens generally all die, but the spores survive. Staphylococcus aureus and related organisms survive well, but in most cases there is wide variation of susceptibility among microorganisms, even among closely related species (Figure 8). In any case, freezing is not a dependable means to destroy microorganisms since some cells of the original population almost always survive.

Any number of additive trials can be performed. Some additives have specific effects to watch out for – such as ribonucleotides (E627, E631, E635) which tend to cause rashes (“ribo rash”), or aspartame (E951) which tends to have MSG-like effects and cause depression. Additives not on the problem list are less likely to be problematic, however some other additives not in this list have been shown to have adverse effects on people. Splenda (sucralose, E955) can cause rashes especially in the chlorine sensitive, and sugar alcohols or polyols (E420, E421, E953, E965-E968, E1100) tend to cause digestive distress.

Do you find milk addictive? If so, assume an opioid-like peptide reaction. Does milk make you sneeze? If so, assume an intolerance to the immunological compounds and/or opioids, or a genuine allergic reaction – particularly if milk makes your throat itch. Does milk make you gain weight? If so, assume an opioid-like peptide reaction and/or sensitivity to IGF. Does milk provoke seizures? If so, you may need to test your reaction to calcium.
For suspected opioid-like peptide responders, individuals should test A1 milk (regular cow’s milk) versus officially branded A2 milk (Guernsey cow, buffalo, goat’s and sheep’s milk). People who are intolerant of opioids usually tolerate goat’s and sheep’s milk unless they are super-responders. See the gluten and casein responders page . Cream and Butter

Propionates food additives

propionates food additives

Do you find milk addictive? If so, assume an opioid-like peptide reaction. Does milk make you sneeze? If so, assume an intolerance to the immunological compounds and/or opioids, or a genuine allergic reaction – particularly if milk makes your throat itch. Does milk make you gain weight? If so, assume an opioid-like peptide reaction and/or sensitivity to IGF. Does milk provoke seizures? If so, you may need to test your reaction to calcium.
For suspected opioid-like peptide responders, individuals should test A1 milk (regular cow’s milk) versus officially branded A2 milk (Guernsey cow, buffalo, goat’s and sheep’s milk). People who are intolerant of opioids usually tolerate goat’s and sheep’s milk unless they are super-responders. See the gluten and casein responders page . Cream and Butter

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